Recruiting Process – Education

Momentum has partnered with VolleyballRecruits.net. It is a recruiting tool built by former college volleyball players that dramatically increases the exposure a player receives throughout the recruiting process. With every NCAA and NAIA college coach as a registered user, a VolleyballRecruits.net Recruiting Package ensures a player gets the most out of his or her college volleyball recruiting process. Additionally, all players should create a free University Athlete account. This is the system coaches use at most tournaments to find and evaluate players. This should be used as an addition to individual efforts, not as the sole form of reaching out.

Try not to rely on sites that coaches need to have an account to sign up for. Use Momentumvbc.com as your main resource to send coaches to, and link your other pages from there.

Dana has coaching/recruiting experience and relationships that she has built over the years that will help guide our student-athletes in achieving their goals. Dana’s email address is draber@momentumvbc.com should you have additional questions.

Getting started:

NCAA Eligibility Center

Checklist for registering

Fill out player questionnaire (download to edit; post to Momentumvbc.com)

Fill out resume to attach with emails (download to edit in word)

You should also register with these free recruiting services:

Rich Kern
Be Recruited
University Athlete ****

Helpful Recruiting Links:

Division I Recruiting Calendar

Division II Recruiting Calendar

NCAA Recruiting Resources

NAIA

Difference in Divisions

Scholarship Statistics

Volleyball Recruiting Guidelines

AVCA Website

Prep Volleyball

USA Volleyball

Financial Tips: 

Western Undergraduate Exchange

FASFA

Helpful Articles by Recruiting U:
Recruiting What do I say

Recruiting What Level Should I Play

Recruiting Seven Ways to Still Impress Coaches When Everything Falls Apart on the Court

Recruiting As You’re Finding Nemo, Look For These College Coaches Along The Way

Helicopter Parents: Are you hurting your athlete’s chance at a scholarship? Helicopter Parents Gateway Region

Sample Letters to Send to Coaches:

Guideline for initial email

Recruiting Letter Sample 1

Recruiting Letter Sample 2

Athletic Resume:
Sample Resume

Example Recruiting Timeline

Freshman Year

  • Begin your Athletic Resume, website (VolleyballRecruits.net), and videos
  • Build your player profile through Momentumvbc.com
  • Begin researching schools that interest you and start making a list.
  • Consider attending a volleyball camp at schools on your list to get to know the coaching staff and their program.

Sophomore Year

  • Update your Athletic Resume, website and videos
  • Send the schools on your interest list an introductory letter, including your e-mail address, club schedule, and your coach’s phone number and e-mail address.
  • Complete and return any information sheets that schools may send you.
  • Reply to e-mails you receive from schools on your list.
  • Register with free sources such as Be Recruited, University Athlete and Rich Kern.
  • Consider attending a volleyball camp at schools on your list to get to know the coaching staff and their program.

Junior Year

  • Update your Athletic Resume and send to coaches who are not able to come see you play.
  • Make unofficial visits to any schools you are seriously considering.
  • Refine your list, adding new schools and dropping schools as needed.
  • Many top players will make verbal commitments during the spring and summer of their Junior Year.
  • Continue to respond to e-mails. If you have made a commitment respond appropriately.
  • Take the SAT or ACT test and inform schools of your results. If you don’t like your results, retake the SAT only.
  • Attend a volleyball camp at schools on your list to get to know the coaching staff.
  • Register for the NCAA Clearinghouse.(www.ncaa.org )

Senior Year

  • Narrow your list to schools interested in you. As schools receive commitments, those schools will drop the rest of their recruits. This is the most difficult part of the process, since schools that have recruited you for more than a year may suddenly drop you.
  • Although some players will begin committing as Juniors, many players do not commit until their Senior year.
  • Apply to the schools on your final list.
  • Make a verbal commitment when you are ready.
  • Sign a National Letter-of-Intent if required.

Frequently Asked Questions:

For the most part, parents should not talk with coaches on the sidelines.

*Note this information is more important for college coaches then the players/parents. However, this is important to know if you plan on making unofficial visits.

What is a contact?

A contact occurs any time a college coach says more than hello during a face-to-face contact with a college-bound student-athlete or his or her parents off the college’s campus.

What is a contact period?

During a contact period a college coach may have face-to-face contact with college-bound student-athletes or their parents, watch student-athletes compete and visit their high schools, and write or telephone student-athletes or their parents.

What is an evaluation period?

During an evaluation period a college coach may watch college-bound student-athletes compete, visit their high schools, and write or telephone student-athletes or their parents. However, a college coach may not have face-to-face contact with college-bound student-athletes or their parents off the college’s campus during an evaluation period.

What is a quiet period?

During a quiet period a college coach may only have face-to-face contact with college-bound student-athletes or their parents on the college campus. A coach may not watch student-athletes compete (unless a competition occurs on the college’s campus) or visit their high schools. Coaches may write or telephone college-bound student-athletes or their parents during this time.

What is a dead period?

During a dead period a college coach may not have face-to-face contact with college-bound student-athletes or their parents, and may not watch student-athletes compete or visit their high schools. Coaches may write and telephone student-athletes or their parents during a dead period.

What is the difference between an official visit and an unofficial visit?

Any visit to a college campus by a college-bound student-athlete or his or her parents paid for by the college is an official visit. Visits paid for by college-bound student-athletes or their parents are unofficial visits.

During an official visit the college can pay for transportation to and from the college for the prospect, lodging and three meals per day for both the prospect and the parent or guardian, as well as reasonable entertainment expenses including three tickets to a home sports event.

The only expenses a college-bound student-athlete may receive from a college during an unofficial visit are three tickets to a home sports event.

What is a National Letter of Intent?

A National Letter of Intent is signed by a college-bound student-athlete when the student-athlete agrees to attend a Division I or II college or university for one academic year. Participating institutions agree to provide financial aid for one academic year to the student-athlete as long as the student-athlete is admitted to the school and is eligible for financial aid under NCAA rules. Other forms of financial aid do not guarantee the student-athlete financial aid.

The National Letter of Intent is voluntary and not required for a student-athlete to receive financial aid or participate in sports.

Signing an National Letter of Intent ends the recruiting process since participating schools are prohibited from recruiting student-athletes who have already signed letters with other participating schools.

A student-athlete who has signed a National Letter of Intent may request a release from his or her contract with the school. If a student-athlete signs a National Letter of Intent with one school but attends a different school, he or she will lose one full year of eligibility and must complete a full academic year at their new school before being eligible to compete.

What are recruiting calendars?

Recruiting calendars help promote the well-being prospective student-athletes and coaches and ensure competitive equity by defining certain time periods in which recruiting may or may not occur in a particular sport.